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Please share lesson plans you have developed and links to those available elsewhere.
2/16/2010 12:37:40 PM

abrooks
abrooks
Posts: 37
Subject: NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION
Alison Brooks
Special Ed/6th Grade
February 12, 2010

Lesson in multicultural nonverbal communication
Standards: California grade six reading standard Narrative Analysis of Grade-level-Appropriate Text 3.2 Analyze the effect of the qualities of the character (e.g., courage or cowardice, ambition or laziness) on the plot and the resolution of the conflict.
3.3 Analyze the influence of setting on the problem and its resolution.
3.4 Define how tone or meaning is conveyed in poetry through word choice, figurative language, sentence structure, line length, punctuation, rhythm, repetition, and rhyme.
3.5 Identify the speaker and recognize the difference between first-and third-person narration (e.g., autobiography compared with biography).
3.6 Identify and analyze features of themes conveyed through characters, actions, and images.
3.7 Explain the effects of common literary devices (e.g., symbolism, imagery, metaphor) in writing.

1.0 Writing Strategies
Students write clear, coherent, and focused essays. The writing exhibits students' awareness of the audience and purpose. Essays contain formal introductions, supporting evidence, and conclusions. Students progress through the stages of the writing process as needed.
Organization and Focus
1.1 Choose the form of writing (e.g., personal letter, letter to the editor, review, poem, report, narrative) that best suits the intended purpose.
variety of fictional and nonfictional texts.
Lesson 1: Gestures
Introduction
We may not have time to hear a language , but taking time to learn the "signals" is a powerful communicator. If you see a motion or gesture that is new or confusing , ask a local person what it signifies. Then, be aware of the many body signs and customs around you.
Source: Axtell, Roger E. Gestures: The Do's and Taboos of Body Language Around the World. John Wiley & Sons, 1991.
Teacher to lead discussion of American gestures. Students are to create a flip book with each gesture drawn and properly labeled.
Gesture Meaning
Americans shake hands, and from an early age they are taught to do so with a firm., solid grip. When greeting one another.
American children are taught to look others directly in the eyes. When greeting and conversing. If not, means shyness or weakness.
Arm raised and the open hand "waggles" back and forth. Signaling "hello" or "good-bye." Or trying to get someone's attention.
Americans will often wave to another person and then turn to make hand scoop inward; or raise the index finger ) palm toward one's face, and make a "curling " motion with that finger. To beckon or summon another person.
Palm facing out with the index and middle fingers displayed in the shape of a "V." "Victory" or "peace."
Thumb and forefinger form a circle with the other three fingers splayed upward; it is used frequently and enthusiastically. "O.K." meaning "fine" or "yes."
Thumb up with a close fist. Meaning support or approval, "O.K." or "Good Going!" or "Good job!"
Fist raised with index finger and little finger extended. Texas rallying call "hook 'em horns." Baseball meaning "two outs."
Whistling Pretty woman, cheering at sporting events, applauding performances.
Nodding and shaking the head. Yes and No
Extend the forefinger and make a circular motion near the temple or ear. Something or someone is "crazy."

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Lesson Two China
 GREETINGS GESTURES
 The western custom of shaking hands is the customary form of greeting, but often s nod of the head or slight bow is sufficient. Hugging and kissing when greeting are uncommon.
 Business cards are often exchanged, and yours should be printed in your own language and in Chinese. Also, it is more respectful to present your card (or a gift or any other article) using both hands.
 The Chinese are enthusiastic applauders. You may be greeted with group clapping, even by small children. When a person is applauded in this fashion it is the custom for that person to return the applause or a "thank you."
 When walking in public places, direct eye contact and staring is uncommon in the larger cities, especially in those areas accustomed to foreign visitors. However, in smaller communities, visitors may be the subject of much curiosity and therefore you may notice some stares.
 TOUCHING GESTURES
 Genrally speaking, the Chinese are not a touch-oriented society (especially true for visitors). So avoid touching or any prolonged form of body contact.
 Public displays of affection are very rare. On the other hand, you may note people of the same sex walking hand-in-hand, which is simply a gesture of friendship.
 Don't worry about a bit of pushing and shoving in stores or when groups board public buses or trains. Apologies are neither offered or expected.
 Personal space is much less in China. The Chinese will stand much closer than Westerners.
 BECKONING GESTURES
 To beckon someone, the palm faces downward and the fingers are moved in a scratching motion. Avoid use the index finger, palm up and toward you, in a back forth curling motion toward your body. That gesture is used only for animals and can be considered rude.
 The open hand is used for pointing (not just one or two fingers,)
 Also, avoid using your feet to gesture or to move or touch other objects because the feet are considered lowly and dirty.
 OTHER NONVERBAL GESTURES
 Avoid being physically intimidating (be humble), especially with older or more senior people.
 Posture is important, so don't slouch or put your feet on desks or chairs.
 Silence is perfectly acceptable and customary. Silence (listening) is a sign of politeness and of contemplation. During conversations, be especially careful about interrupting.
 Chinese like to avoid saying "no." A gesture that is often used to signal "no" or that "something is very difficult" (pausing to rethink) is to tip the head backward and audibly suck air in through the teeth.
 On public streets, spitting and blowing the nose without the benefit of a handkerchief is fairly common, although the government is waging a campaign to reduce this in the cities. It used to be regarded as ridding the body of a waste- an act of personal hygiene . However, today it is a sign of "low" class or uneducated.
Teacher to lead discussion of Chinese gestures. Students are to create a flip book with each gesture drawn and properly labeled.

Day three: Japan
In summary, for most visitors the Japanese are complex and difficult to understand. Remember two things: (1) style, or the way things are done, is just as important as substance, or what is being done; and (2) watch your Japanese hosts carefully and follow their example.
 GREETING GESTURES
 The graceful act of bowing is the traditional greeting.
 However, they have also adopted the western custom of shaking hands, albeit with a light grip and perhaps with eyes averted. Meanwhile, to show respect for their customs, it would flatter them to offer a slight bow when being introduced.
 Avoid hugging and kissing when greeting.
 It is considered rude to stare. Prolonged direct eye contact is considered impolite or even intimidating.
 It is considered rude to stand with your hand or hands in your pockets, especially when greeting someone or when addressing a group of people.
 The seemingly simple act of exchanging business cards is more complex in japn becuae the business card represents not only one's identity but one's station in life. Yours should be printed in your own language and in Japanese.
 TOUCHING GESTURES
 The Japanese are not a touch-oriented society, so avoid open displays of affection, touching or any prolonged form of body contact.
 Queues are generally respected; it is only in crowded train and subway stations where the huge volume of people causes touching and pushing.
 BECKONING GESTURES
 It is considered insulting to point to someone fingers extended and the thinb folded into the palm.
 To beckon someone, the palm faces downward and the fingers are moved in a scratching motion.
 OTHER NONVERBAL GESTURES
 Because of the high regard for graciousness and restraint, one should not shout, raise the voice in anger, or exhibit any excessively demonstrative behavior.
 Among the Japanese, smiling often can cover a gamut of emotions: happiness, anger, confusion, apologies, or sadness.
 Displaying an open mouth (such as yawning or a wide open laugh) is considered rude in Japan, especially with women who cover their mouths when giggling or laughing.
 Try to maintain a balanced posture stand or sit erectly or squarely. Do not slouch or put your feet on desks or chairs. When seated have both feet squarely on the ground with arms in the lap or on the armrests. Crossing the legs at the knee or ankles is the preferred form rather than with one ankle over the other knee.
 Silence is perfectly acceptable and customary. Silence (listening) is a sign of politeness and of contemplation. During conversations, be especially careful about interrupting.
 One way to show concentration and attentiveness is to close the eyes in contemplation and nod the head slight, up and down.
 Japanese men like to avoid saying "no", but one gesture that is often used ti signal "no" or that "something is very difficult" is to tip the head backward and audibly suck air in through the teeth.
 OTHER NONVERBAL GESTURES
 A gesture saying "I do not know," or "I don't understand" or "No, I am undeserving" is waving the hand back and forth in front of one's own face (palm outward).
 The "O.K." gesture in Japan may be interpreted as the signal for "money" or "give me change in coins."
 Blowing your nose in public is considered rude. The handkerchief is used primarily for wiping the mouth or drying the hands when leaving the washroom. Paper tissues are used for blowing the nose and then discarded.
 When entering a private home or traditional restaurants with tatami (bamboo mats) floors, it is usually customary to remove your shoes and place them with the toes pointing toward the outdoors.
 BOWING
 Many westerners view the bow as an act of subservience, but in Japan that would completely wrong. For the Japanese a bow signals respect and humility, two qualities coveted throughout Asia.
 Although it is not absolutely necessary, but a slight bow demonstrate that you respect their customs. And in Japan, where style and grace and courteousness are revered, that simply act would surely be noted, appreciated, and probably remembered.
 WHO BOWS FIRST? AND HOW LOW DOES ONE BOW? In Japanese, it is extremely important to know the rank of people with whom you come in contact.
The person of lower rank bows first and lowest.
 Respect is always shown to elderly people, so it is appropriate to rise when a person-- especially an elderly man enters the room or giving up a seat on a subway. However, an elder may not give up a seat for a young boy.
Teacher to lead discussion of Japanese gestures. Students are to create a flip book


Gestures Lesson Rubric
________________________________________
Teacher Name: Mrs. Brooks


Student Name: ________________________________________


CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Score
CLASS PARTICIPATION I stayed on task , listened and participated to the lesson. I mostly stayed on task, listened and participated to the lesson. I mostly stayed on task, listened and participated to the lesson. I had a hard time staying on task and listened and participating in the lesson.
CREATING O A AMERICAN GESTURES FLIP BOOK MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED SIX DIFFERENT AMERICAN GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FIVE DIFFERENT AMERICAN GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FOUR DIFFERENT AMERICAN GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED THREE DIFFERENT AMERICAN GESTURES

CREATING OF A CHINESE GESTURES FLIP BOOK MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED SIX DIFFERENT CHINESE GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FIVE DIFFERENT CHINESE GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FOUR DIFFERENT CHINESE GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED THREE DIFFERENT CHINESE
GESTURES
CREATING A JAPANESE GESTURES FLIP BOOK MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED SIX DIFFERENT JAPANESE
GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FIVE DIFFERENT JAPANESE GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED FOUR DIFFERENT JAPANESE GESTURES MY FLIP BOOK CORRECTLY SHOWED THREE
DIFFERENT JAPANESE GESTURES
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2/22/2010 11:02:33 AM

agalloway
agalloway
Posts: 33
Subject: Re: NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION
Wow! This is truly an impressive lesson and I am sure students enjoy learning about new cultures and customs. I have had a similar experience with substitute teaching in a middle school PE class. The teacher i was subbing for counted one through ten in a different language daily. This made jumping jacks, etc. more bearable and fun. Unknown to me, I was subbing on Swahili day (he always told them the next day's language the day before.) I had nop idea how to count to ten in Swahili and the kids were very disappointed. Several kids were close to tears! When you find something the love, they will love it well.

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AJGalloway
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